Child with iPad v2I just read a wonderful article titled "Re-Enabled" in The Magazine. The author, Steven Aquino, legally blind, works with special needs pre-schoolers. His and their lives have improved dramatically through the use of Macs and iPads.

Steve Jobs said, "It's technology married with liberal arts ... that yields us the results that make our hearts sing.""I like that intersection. There's something magical about that place."

HandiNews International brings you information about the hottest companies' technologies in this magical place.

"Re-Enabled" brings you the story of a man who works there every day...

Aquino's own experience: as a child he had to carry large-print books that were thick, heavy and ugly - an embarrassing  stigma. Now he can "pinch-to-zoom" on a screen and create text as large as he likes.

He says about his special needs pre-schoolers, "The iPad's power for these children lies in the fact that we don't need to teach how to use the thing."

Many of the children do not interact easily, but respond well to technology. The iPad motivates them, and keeps them "attentive and engaged far better and longer than any of our conventional tools."

Aquino adds, "I feel extremely fortunate that I'm living in this time. Being able to manipulate content with just my two fingers ... feels genuinely magical to me. I often wonder how I made it though 12 years of schooling without multi-touch gestures and VoiceOver."

These tools are "a bionic enhancement ... a pocket full of superpowers... They're tools of independence, and of participation."

A great explanation of some of the ways technology is working for us!

Re-Enabled --- The Magazine